Tag Archives: amnesty

2011: Will the Undocumented be Counted?

2010 demonstrates what the Democrats lost and what the Republicans may gain.  However, it seems like Newt Gingrich and the Bush Family are among a small handful of GOP Members listening.  The issue: is a legalization really an amnesty? The answer is no.

Who gains from calling a legalization an “amnesty?” I think those that want to encourage everyone to apply, even those who do not qualify, perhaps.  When will immigration attorneys begin to tell the truth?

Congress has passed “registry” and “legalization.” Neither were guarantees of a green card. Many were disqualified and others simply messed up their opportunity due to confusion over the program. Legalization was co-sponsored by Republican Alan Simpson, but  signed by President Reagan.  It was an effort to focus enforcement on newer offenders, since immigration enforcement is pitifully underfunded.

Our current Immigration law boldly states that those delegated by the Attorney General, namely the Department of Homeland Security, “may” place an alien in deportation proceedings. Many are left in limbo due to the lack of immigration judges and underfunded law enforcement.

In the end, when Congress has failed to impose its solutions, it must find rational alternatives. Legalization was an effort to normalize the lives of millions of U.S. Residents, who we depended upon to sustain our U.S. Economy. The challenge was that USCIS had to find a responsible way to evaluate these cases.

With whatever experience is left from the last legalization and registry, Congress should reasonably act to tap that experience for the next before all of these folks retire. Otherwise, it will cost Our Nation much more the next time.

Why some attorneys continue to call Legalization or Registry an amnesty confuses the public and is a disappointment to advocates for reasonable change.

The DREAM Bill is Deferred, Again!

Yesterday, Congress voted to delay action on the Defense Bill.  In doing so, again, it left the long overdue DREAM Bill in limbo.  This Bill attempts to help some of the thousands of infants and children who were lawfully or unlawful brought into the U.S.   These children had no control in the decision to remain.

Now, many have grown up, attended grammar school, high school, and eventually graduated only to be locked out of the University Education system by the F-1 student visa process.  With unskilled jobs, these now grown and American educated residents have been swallowed up into our expanding black market economy. Only to be spit out whenever politicians put pressure on the Department of Homeland Security to raid a large target.

Former General Colin Powell, among many moderate and reasonable Republicans support the DREAM Bill. This law is not amnesty, since a number of applicants must be denied, where they are disqualified from immigration for other reasons.

The idea that all bills attempting to legalize those who are physically present in the U.S.  are an amnesty is a myth.  To call these people “illegal” is an injustice to desensitize their plight!

These kids, all grown up, are unlawfully present waiting for an answer.  Some claim that this is a somehow a partial amnesty.  Arguably, but in response, those familiar with the U.S. Immigration System appreciate the oppression that results in deporting residents who live in the U.S. for five, perhaps ten, even twenty or more years.

In deporting, and ignorning, we penalize  these residents for the acts of their parents and unforgiving immigration laws.  We also ignore the failure of Congress to reasonable fund immigration enforcement. Our sporadically enforced system of civil immigration laws challenge an already overburdened Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency that has much more serious priorities like human trafficking, terrorism and drug smuggling.

There is a misconception that a visa overstay or someone who entered without inspection  is a criminal.  As a matter of law, this is a myth.  The myth is perpetuated in the news as talking heads, who are not attorneys, make good faith, yet false claims to be immigration law experts.

Appropriate and humane, not indefinitely mean spirited, laws should be in place to regulate those who are not, and cannot, be timely removed from the U.S. Otherwise, we emotionally damage U.S. Citizens whose children, employees, parents, and spouses must be permanently deported based upon our current unforgiving system.

There is something extremely vindictive about deporting someone who has lived in the U.S. for over twenty years.  What part of ‘unconscionable’ do Americans fail to understand?

For more information, albeit somewhat unclear, the Washington Post has written this article.

The “A” Word: Who Gets to Be a Lawful Permanent Resident?

An “immigration amnesty” has never existed in U.S. Immigration History.  An immigration amnesty is imagined by the public.  Amnesty is a concept contrived by anti-immigration lobbyists.  Perhaps, also by those totally oblivious to the political reality of  the United States or Mexico.  Its use deters democracy and spurs injustice.  Yes, Mexico also has a serious mental block when comes to enacting realistic immigration laws, as well!  This hypocrisy is legendary.

For those who know, a person ‘may’ be placed in deportation proceedings upon denial for an immigration benefit.  This means that the DHS is sometimes lenient on those who make mistakes; civil immigration laws are complicated!  When the U. S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, based upon Congressional mandate, is not lenient, the consequences are devastating to both U.S. Citizens and foreign born residents!

An amnesty purest will not press their luck.  Yet, a few attorneys know the secret.  They know that there has always been a need for a form of perpetual legalization.  However, calling “legalization” an amnesty more often distracts supporters.

The U.S. Body Politique, in general, considers “amnesty” to be a dirty word in immigration.  Let’s get used to it!  A perpetual and reasonable “Legalization,” not amnesty, is what purges those from the system who are questionable casualties in the road to immigration enforcement and reform.

So what should advocates for immigration enforcement and reform do?  Well, if we understand the definition of how the so-called amnesty of it all functions, it helps.  Those with experience accept that there are not enough dollars to hire enough immigration officers and judges.  Those who come in throngs to apply may lose money, but not their right to try try, again, even if they continue to fail miserably at getting a green card.  A nicer and more proper phrase for “green card status” is “lawful permanent residence [also “LPR” for short].  Some are indefinitely or permanently barred from immigration for petty reasons that may persist in the system regardless of reform.

Too many for too long are reasonably frightened of the Department of Homeland Security, which was once known as the Immigration and Naturalization Service.  This Agency makes quite a few oversights, but this would be expected when Congress under funds training and passes unrealistic laws.  The limited form of amnesty is why those who could not prove that they entered the U.S. before January 1, 1981 to the satisfaction of a skeptical immigration officer could avoid being wronged statistics.

These alleged unsuccessful throngs were not immediately referred to immigration court for deportation when their Legalization application was improperly or properly denied!  Yes, to this day there may be some who have lived unlawfully, under the radar for three decades without relief!  Others eventually become victims of immigration witch doctors who promised that an amnesty exists until D.H.S. executes a final deportation order.  What do we do with these people, who often become burnt out and oblivious to U.S.Immigration Law? Pretend that they do not exist?  Pretend that big brother is gonna get them?  Well, they’re not leaving.  By ignoring them, do we encourage un-policed human rights abuses within our own borders?

If we ever understand and admit the historical truths caused by shortsighted immigration laws, then we will stop abusing the term “amnesty.” We must start accepting some form of legalization for those who entered without inspection or overstayed their visas.  Too many of our acquaintances, friends and neighbors were taken advantage of (at times) by unscrupulous attorneys, immigration witch doctors, employers or foreign born parents.  Too many lost wages and their future, because our Federal Government lacks the tax base and political will to enforce and arguably prosecute the general population into immigration compliance.  Let’s face it; it just isn’t going to happen, whether we like it or not!

When we can face the simplest fact that civil immigration laws merit some limitations and a purge valve, then we will appreciate the countless U.S. human rights abuses that result from confusion, ignorance, and insensitivity.  We can ill afford the mean spirited ignorance that labels every effort to normalize the lives our our foreign born residents, “an amnesty!”

A legalization, not an amnesty, that closes the door on perpetual human rights abuses within and around our own borders preserves democracy as we know it.  Taxation without representation is a challenge!  However, let’s face it, there may be no amnesty, but there must be understanding and reckoning.  Otherwise our system of laws and the democracy for which we stand or fall will deteriorate from a warped sense of our immigration realities!

DREAM Bill: Senator Durban Needs Anonymous Examples

We have encouraged those who entered the U.S. at a young age, graduated from High School, but cannot leave to support the DREAM Bill.  This is not a law, so it is NOT an Act, yet.  This Bill has remained a bill for nearly a decade, because some think it is amnesty.

The Bill proposes to cure the injustice to infants and children, who involuntarily must leave the nation of their birth because of their parents only to face no future as adults in nation of their birth, which they no longer know, because they have lived here for so long.  The unlawful presence bar, along with no realistic non-immigration visa options, ruins most of their chances of returning to the nation where they were raised, that is, the U.S.

This came from Meg McCarthy of The National Immigration Justice Center:

July 12, 2010

To Whom it May Concern:

Senator Richard Durbin (D-IL) is looking for stories of people who would benefit from the DREAM Act, a bipartisan bill that would give a select group of immigrant students the chance to earn legal status. He says these stories will help him influence senators who are on the fence about immigration reform. Stories should be emailed to Dreamers@durbin.senate.gov. Please see the senator’s announcement with more details below.
Tell Senator Durbin Your Dreams!

Senator Dick Durbin, the lead sponsor of the DREAM Act, is gathering the stories of young people who would be eligible for the DREAM Act.

The DREAM Act is a bipartisan bill that would give a select group of immigrant students the chance to earn legal status.  You may be eligible for the DREAM Act if:

  • You came to the United States as a child (15 or under);
  • You are a long-term U.S. resident (five years or more); and
  • You have graduated (or will graduate) from high school or have obtained (or will obtain) a GED;

Senator Durbin needs your help as he works to pass the DREAM Act. Telling the stories of DREAM Act students is the best way to build support for the bill.  If you are a DREAM Act student, send your story to Dreamers@durbin. senate.gov.

Tell Senator Durbin:

  • When did you come to the United States?
  • Where did you come from?
  • Where do you live?
  • Where are you going to school?
  • What are you studying?
  • What are your hobbies?
  • What would you like to do when you graduate?
  • What are your dreams for the future?
  • Have you ever been in deportation proceedings?

Some of the stories will be posted on the DREAM Act page of Senator Durbin’s website.

At your request, your name and/or your story will be kept strictly confidential.

Unlawful Immigration, Legalization, Propaganda and the International Condition.

We have reached the point where foreigners have remained unlawfully for a generation.  Now, their children are born and experience the fruits of U.S. Citizenship.  A few who entered as innocent infants still await forgiveness.  Yet, America supposedly does not believe in corruption of blood.  The reason why the DREAM Bill should become law is to protect these infants who have often reached adulthood.

The anti-immigration folks will continue steaming, because their job will never be done.  Many have concerns about zero population growth, which is an arguably lofty and reasonble goal.  Yet, this desire is distorted when it comes to the enforcement and enactment of some of our immigration laws.  They have made many American Citizens miserable psychological wrecks.  Too many feel compelled to ignore lawful immigration as a viable lifestyle.

Too many American Citizens continue to ignore our employment immigration laws, since the laws are too often dubious and unworkable.  The meanspirited, who cannot get Congress to spend enough of our tax dollars,  now want to make indefinite generations illegal and overcome with perpetual grief.

Such a plan will ultimately challenge our democracy as was done in the Middle East to Christians, Jews, and Palestinians, alike.  In essence, our current immigration laws eliminate representation of the people, by the people, and for the people.  These nativists have lived too long without a conscience to appreciate the current reality of major metropolitan America.

We persist with an immigration legal system akin to an unrealistic citizen state.  Like fallen Rome, will our nation be more content with a coliseum built to feed our unlawful immigrants to the lions?  This, for the sake of the feigned superiority of purportedly law abiding Americans?  We must put a halt to our hypocrisy!

There remains an unrealistic desire to create some sort of pure American Citizenry.  Such rhetoric neglects America’s roots as a nation of strength through diversity.  We are a nation of immigrants; lawful or unlawful. We must appreciate and strengthen our worldly bonds between nations.  Our friendship, peace, and tolerance reasonably exercised  improves international democracy and diplomacy.

America needs to get a grip on its people and its power.  America needs to welcome the newcomer, guest worker, or visitor with ‘reasonable safeguards’ in place. We need to greet with the appreciation, dignity and respect that each reasonable individual deserves to an appropriate extent.  Americans, among others, should try to be the best international citizens in a world even if challenged by bigotry, prejudice, persecution and xenophobia.  There should be funding for enforcement in conjunction with a reasonable statute of limitation on certain types of deportation.

We need to confirm to the world how we appreciate, care and understand culture; both ours and those of other nations.  Our media should promote and recognize the fact that most of us do quite well as ambassadors of good will.

Yet, a few in the media may thrive on exaggeration and ignorance for power and the almighty dollar.  Perhaps, they seek feeding frenzies with critiques and fixations upon the isolated, extremely bigoted, selfish, and vain.  Unfortunately, the folks that may sometimes deserve less of our attention are too often given the most. They can too often bully the pulpit away from more reasonable Citizens depending upon the issue and personalities involved.

A moral form of legalization for the eventual immigration of those who have slightly strayed just makes good sense. Sometimes, enforcement is just not enough!  We need to thin the herd!  We know that some will be disqualified for legalization; this will be based upon their criminal and immigration records.  There should be limits on how long Citizens hold a grudge against those who  entered without inspection. The United States must be part of the cure, not simply be allowed to perpetuate the mess.

Mexico also seems like a cesspool of insensitivity to lawful immigration. Perhaps, its economy is in need of a legalization upgrade, as well!  Enacting a form of legalization can create an immigration statute of limitations, albeit temporary.  Legalization is similar to more permanent laws enacted in developed nations like the United Kingdom.  America, it’s time to be civil with immigration.

The Immigration System Needs to Legalize Itself.

America’s immigration policy remains an international farce, just like other nations.  Politicians appease a few talking heads eager to catapult the public into hysteria.  The truth is the U.S. economy will fall flat without newcomers.  As a result, too many capitalize upon unlawfully present foreigners.  Our nation ignores that the present set of immigration laws are inconsistently enforced, administratively ridiculous, hinder our economy, and lack moral justification. 

 

We pretend that most of our U.S. Employers are virtuous.  We try to bar the unlawful from getting a social security or tax identification; this means that they cannot timely pay taxes.We pretend that the Government somehow has enough funding to ensure that our morally bankrupt immigration system will be enforced.  Even our courts have difficulty so they enforce chaotically with a set of legal mechanisms geared for failure. 

We Americans seduce millions to remain unlawfully; we hire them to work in our economy without lawful status.  Who are we fooling?  The Trojan Horses have continued to land bearing  laborers that want to work for employers who depend upon loyal employees.  The numbers of the unlawfully present, with or without expired I-94 cards, have swelled to ridiculous levels.  Unfortunately, our Government prefers to take a laissez faire status quo attitude. Few are getting deported, overall, and those who do simply return to creatie a more dysfunctional immigration system.  Isn’t it time to reconsider the consequences?  Isn’t it time to reasonably level the playing field after over twenty years? 

A new legalization or registry program is long overdue!  Call it by its real names!  Illogical and unjustifiably meanspirited immigration laws have overcome us with dread. We have repeated history with our vindictive greed and insensitivity.  In America’s hysteria, it created another witch hunt with immigration laws.  We, again, sit like idle fools before a monolith like that in 2001: A Space Odyssey.  We await a reckoning.  Can’t you sense Deodato playing in the background?  HAL, open the Pod doors!